Summer Heat and Your Brain
Jun30

Summer Heat and Your Brain

During a perfect Sunday summer afternoon, you probably don’t think twice when you feel relaxed, unmotivated, and without a care in the world. However, have you ever wondered what puts the “lazy” in those lazy days of summer? The heat’s effect on your brain may have a lot to do with your productivity, or lack thereof, when the temperatures rise. What’s Happening in Your Brain?   When you’re sitting outside, getting a much needed dose of natural Vitamin D, the sun feels good for awhile, but the more time you spend outside (particularly as the temperatures start to rise), you may start to feel sleepy and lose all ambition for the day. So, how come some people start to feel tired, weak, or have a hard time focusing when they get too hot? Your hypothalamus, the part of your brain that is responsible for controlling your body temperature (among other things), stops working efficiently the more the temperatures rise.   As your body heats up, your sweat glands work hard and draw water from the bloodstream to make the sweat that carries heat through pores, onto the skin surface, and heat is released. However, when more blood goes toward your body surface for cooling off, less blood is available to your brain and other muscles and organs. The more you sweat, the the more water your body loses and unless you stay adequately hydrated you may feel symptoms of heat illness such as poor concentration, fatigue, confusion, and even unconsciousness. Change in Behavior and Mood   Even if the heat makes you feel sleepy, it’s likely that you won’t be able to get that much needed sleep for your brain if you’re unable to cool down. Not only can the warm temperatures put you at risk for a dangerous heat-related illness and a poor night of rest, but the heat can change your mood and behavior. Ever wonder why people seem a little more irritable or why the incidences of conflict seems higher in the summertime? It’s a safe bet that the heat plays some part in the way that we act and feel, especially when the heat forces our adrenaline to rise, resulting in the classic “flight or fight” response. How Hot is Too Hot to Stay Motivated this Summer?   While it may sound like an excuse, the temperatures can be responsible for how much you’re able to accomplish throughout the day. Chances are, the hotter you are, the less you’ll get done. Take work, for example. How many times have you struggled through the morning, only to realize that you’re overheated and the temperature in the...

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What Causes You to Feel Pain?
Jun15

What Causes You to Feel Pain?

While no one ever expects to get hurt in a slip and fall accident, it happens all the time. Being injured in a fall, a car accident or at work can cause your body to react in ways that you never thought possible. Oftentimes, your body reacts in an uncomfortable way. It is going through a lot of pain and isn’t sure how to react. However, it is important to remember that not every type of pain is the same. If you break your bone, the level of pain you feel is going to be significantly different than if you were to get a papercut. Just like all injuries are different, every person is going to react to the injury differently as well. While you might be able to deal with a lot of pain, someone else might not be able to. Injuries Affect Your Brain After an injury, your body is going to react a certain way: There are certain parts of your brain that are activated following an injury. A signal is sent through your spinal cord and to the area that was injured causing you to feel pain. This natural reaction is what allows you to make it through the injury and begin recovering. If you never felt pain, it would make it quite difficult to recover from the injury. Whatever you do, don’t try to walk an injury off. It is only going to amplify the problem and make things far worse for you down the road. Especially if the accident has caused brain damage or head trauma. These injuries can be serious and even life threatening. You need to give your body time to process what happened and go through the healing process. Your doctor can walk you through the process and what you need to do to make a full recovery. Don’t ever attempt to treat your injuries on your own. You need to take things slowly and follow-through with what the doctor orders. If they tell you to take a week or two off of work, you need to do it. Time is of the essence. Give your body what it needs and you can expect a full recovery. Pain Can Last Your Entire Life Depending on what type of injury you sustained, the pain could stick around for quite some time. Roughly, 25 percent of all individuals injured will end up dealing with moderate to severe pain a year after the accident occurred. One out of every three people will end up dealing with significant pain three years after the accident took place. A slip and fall lawyer will go to...

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